Articles

Toyota Improves Profit Forecast

Toyota Motor Corp. on Tuesday raised its profit projections for the year ending March 31, saying it could boost sales and rein in costs, but the U.S. market continues to weigh on earnings.
 The company said its operating margin in North America dwindled to about 2% in the quarter ended Sept. 30 as rising incentives on passenger cars offset sales of its trucks and sport-utility vehicles, particularly the RAV4 crossover.

Waymo Hits the Road in Phoenix

Waymo LLC is taking a historic step in the development of fully driverless cars by unleashing the first fleet of robot vehicles on public roads without humans behind the wheel.
 The self-driving car division of Google parent Alphabet Inc. on Tuesday said it quietly began testing the robot vans on Oct. 19 in the Phoenix metro area, and shared its vision of deploying the technology to the public through a taxi service.

Ford's Workhorse Trucks Haul In Solid Profit

Ford Motor Co. delivered a fresh reminder that—amid all the talk about driverless cars and electric vehicles—Detroit is a truck town.
 The No. 2 U.S. auto maker on Thursday reported a 63% third-quarter profit increase, a positive sign following a summer marked by management reshuffling, a renewed cost cutting drive and continued malaise for the share price.

Ford Adds Laser Maker to Driverless-Car Effort

Argo AI LLC, a driverless car developer controlled by Ford Motor Co., has purchased a company that makes laser systems needed to operate cars without human intervention, an important step for a conventional Detroit auto maker looking to boost its role in shaping the industry's transformation.
 Argo AI said Friday it is buying Cranbury, N.J.-based based Princeton Lightwave Inc. for an undisclosed price, a move that provides Ford with more immediate access to so called lidar

Tesla Hits Labor Discord on Model 3

In early 2016, a crisis unfolded at Tesla Inc.'s electric car factory. The company's new Model X sport-utility vehicles were stacking up in the repair yard with misaligned parts.
 Tesla took the unusual step of placing more than a dozen workers at the end of the assembly line to whack doors and side panels into shape with rubber hammers, according to people familiar with the matter. The company suffered months of delays as it learned to build the Model X, leading to long hours and injuries as factory workers rushed to meet lofty goals, say people familiar with the effort.